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Testimonials

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New Product!!!!

Oxalic Acid Vaporizers

Legal in USA!!

March 10th 2015

In the past two decades, the parasitic mite Varroa destructor has become harder to control with synthetic acaricide chemicals due to genetic resistance. We determined the efficacy of the natural chemical oxalic acid (OA) in killing phoretic mites on adult worker bees under field conditions in southern England. We compared three OA application methods (trickling, spraying, and sublimation) at three or four (sublimation) doses, using 110 broodless colonies in early January 2013. Treatment efficacy was assessed by extracting mites from samples of c. 270 worker bees collected immediately before and 10 days after treatment. All three methods could give high varroa mortality, c. 93–95%, using 2.25 g OA per colony. However, sublimation was superior as it gave higher mortality at lower doses (.56 or 1.125 g per colony: trickling 20, 57% mortality; spraying 25, 86%; sublimation 81, 97%.). Sublimation using 2.25 g of OA also resulted in 3 and 12 times less worker bee mortality in the 10 days after application than either trickling or spraying, respectively, and lower colony mortality four months later in mid spring. Colonies treated via sublimation also had greater brood area four months later than colonies treated via trickling, spraying, or control colonies. A second trial in December 2013 treated 89 broodless colonies with 2.25 g OA via sublimation to confirm the previous results. Varroa mortality was 97.6% and 87 (98%) of the colonies survived until spring. This confirms that applying OA via sublimation in broodless honey bee colonies in winter is a highly effective way of controlling V. destructor and causes no harm to the colonies.

Oxalic Acid Vaporizers

We are excited to offer a new product.

The Varrox is the Best Oxalic Acid Vaporizer we have researched. We use it 

to KILL MITES.  Its easy to use and works without harming the 

Queen, Brood, or Adult Bees

Oxalic Acid Vapor kills mites on contact and leaves no residue in the hive.

The mites can't become resistant to Oxalic Acid because the way it works.

The vapor is better and easier to use than the Drench Method.

Europe and the rest of the world have been using Oxalic Acid Vapor for 20+ years.

It's Now legal in the USA!

Check out the "Shop Now" page 

Go to the search window on Left side and type in the "Oxalic"

The system will take you to the Icons/pictures to order.

There is a page also that has FAQ 

It is labeled "Oxalic Acid FAQ" under 

Supplements.

ScientificBeekeeping.com

Beekeeping Through the Eyes of a Biologist 

Why Oxalic Acid?

One note: Its Legal in USA as of March 10, 2015

 European beekeepers, who have dealt with varroa much longer than we have, and who often face regulations that do not look favorably upon chemicals that may contaminate honey, noted that varroa is susceptible to organic acids–such as formic (in ants), acetic (vinegar), lactic (milk acid), citric (citrus fruits), and oxalic (in many plants, including Oxalis). They have done considerable groundbreaking research as to the effectiveness of each of these.

 Both lactic acid and acetic acid have shown some effectiveness in killing varroa, but oxalic has become the organic (carbon-containing) acid of choice. It is approved for, and much used in, a number of European countries, Canada, and New Zealand. It is not yet registered for use in the United States, and as such, this article is directed toward our foreign friends, and informational only for U.S. beekeepers. The ABF, headed by Troy Fore, has petitioned the Feds for registration of OA in sugar syrup, based upon research by Marion Ellis, of the University of Nebraska.

 Oxalic is unusual for an organic acid, which are normally “weak” acids, in that it has a very high dissociation constant—meaning that it acts more like a “mineral acid,” like sulfuric or hydrochloric, than your typical carboxylic acid, like acetic or citric. You could sprinkle pure crystals of citric acid on your tongue (they coat sour gummy worms), and it’s no big deal. If you were to do the same with oxalic acid, you could “burn” the skin right off! Oxalic is about 10,000 times “stronger” than the acetic acid in vinegar (vinegar is a 5% solution of acetic acid).

 Common Oxalis sp.

 Photo of common Oxalis sp. Most kids recognize the sour taste of the flower stems, which is due to oxalic acid.

 Oxalic acid is common in the plant kingdom, because it is repellent to herbivores. It does a few things:

 1. It makes the plant taste sour—go ahead and taste buttercup oxalis, rhubarb, or spinach. The grittiness you feel on your tongue is the oxalic acid reacting with the calcium in your saliva to form oxalates (salts of oxalic acid).

 2. It can make the sap irritating to the mouth, skin, or eyes.

 3. It ties up calcium in the animal’s gut, and cause kidney stones if eaten for extended periods.

4. It can form oxalates. The leaves of one common houseplant Dieffenbachia are noted for this; in fact, the common name of the plant is “dumbcane,” because if you eat it, your tongue will swell up, rendering you unable to speak, or “dumb.” Do not try this experiment: “The [oxalates in] the leaves… are needle-like crystals, which, when eaten, may pierce the mouth, throat and digestive tract as they pass through, causing, at the very least, intense discomfort.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_oxalate).

 

There are many common vegetables that contain oxalic acid or oxalates (http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/Data/Other/oxalic.html). The natural concentration of oxalic acid (oxalates) based on fresh weight in spinach is 0.3-1.2%, in rhubarb 0.2-1.3%, in tea 0.3-2.0%, and in cocoa 0.5-0.9% (Fassett 1973). For the following reasons, oxalic looked like a sure winner for mite control:

 1. It’s a natural part of our diet, so we have a metabolism to deal with it.

 2. It’s a natural part of the environment, so we’re not going to be poisoning anything but the mites.

 3. Since it is not lipid (fat) soluble, it will not build up in the wax of the combs.

 4. It is a natural component of honey, and treatment with oxalic does not appreciably increase the concentration of it in honey (Brødsgaard, 1998).

 5. It is safe and easy to apply (I’ll cover safety and risks at the end of the article).

 How Does One Apply It?

Vaporization is the Best Method. 

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/showAxaArticles?journalCode=tjar20&#aHR0cDovL3d3dy50YW5kZm9ubGluZS5jb20vZG9pL3BkZi8xMC4xMDgwLzAwMjE4ODM5LjIwMTUuMTEwNjc3N0BAQDU=

In the past two decades, the parasitic mite Varroa destructor has become harder to control with synthetic acaricide chemicals due to genetic resistance. We determined the efficacy of the natural chemical oxalic acid (OA) in killing phoretic mites on adult worker bees under field conditions in southern England. We compared three OA application methods (trickling, spraying, and sublimation) at three or four (sublimation) doses, using 110 broodless colonies in early January 2013. Treatment efficacy was assessed by extracting mites from samples of c. 270 worker bees collected immediately before and 10 days after treatment. All three methods could give high varroa mortality, c. 93–95%, using 2.25 g OA per colony. However, sublimation was superior as it gave higher mortality at lower doses (.56 or 1.125 g per colony: trickling 20, 57% mortality; spraying 25, 86%; sublimation 81, 97%.). Sublimation using 2.25 g of OA also resulted in 3 and 12 times less worker bee mortality in the 10 days after application than either trickling or spraying, respectively, and lower colony mortality four months later in mid spring. Colonies treated via sublimation also had greater brood area four months later than colonies treated via trickling, spraying, or control colonies. (You want a strong colony going into the nectar flow?) Vaporize. A second trial in December 2013 treated 89 broodless colonies with 2.25 g OA via sublimation to confirm the previous results. Varroa mortality was 97.6% and 87 (98%) of the colonies survived until spring. This confirms that applying OA via sublimation (Vaporization) in broodless honey bee colonies in winter is a highly effective way of controlling V. destructor and causes no harm to the colonies.